Security Fraud Prevention Center

At Forreston State Bank, our first priority is protecting your sensitive personal information.  We adhere to strict bank-wide security procedures to safeguard your accounts, and we work to proactively detect and prevent fraud.  Forreston State Bank utilizes advanced Online Banking security technology to ensure your privacy and protect your identity.

Here are some tips on how you can protect yourself.

Mobile & Online Security

Stop and think. Take Five to Stop Fraud.

  • Look after your personal details. A genuine bank will never contact you out of the blue to ask for your security details.
  • Think before you click and don’t open links in an unexpected email or text.
  • Be cautious. If you see an advertisement or an offer that seems too good to be true – it very often is. If something feels wrong, use another phone number to contact the source and verify the legitimacy of the contact.
  • Stop and think. Money-mule criminals could try to recruit you via social media. Remember, handling money that’s been obtained fraudulently is a crime.
  • Secure your phone by using its password or PIN feature.
  • Do not respond to text messages asking you to update or validate your account information.
  • Download apps only from reputable sources such as the Apple App Store or Google Play.
  • Sign out of your mobile banking session as soon as you have completed your banking transactions.
  • If you are in a public location, make sure no one is watching you sign in to mobile banking.
  • Keep your phone's operating system up-to-date to ensure the highest level of protection.
  • Change your password regularly.
    • For the first time you login to your internet banking account, you will need to use the password provided by the bank. However, you need to change this password in order to keep your account safe. In addition, keep changing your password at regular intervals. More importantly, keep the password confidential at all times.
  • Do not use public computers to login.
    • Avoid logging in to your bank account at common computers in cyber cafes or libraries. These are crowded places, and there are more chances of your password being traced or seen by others. If you have to login from such places, make sure you clear the cache and browsing history, and delete all the temporary files from the computer. Also, never allow the browser to remember your ID and password.
  • Do not share your details with anyone.
    • Your bank will never ask for your confidential information via phone or email. So whether you get an apparent phone call from the bank or an email requesting your details, do not give out your login information. Use your login ID and password only on the official login page of the bank, which should be a secure website. Look for 'https://' in the URL when logging in; it means that the website is secure.
  • Check your accounts regularly.
    • Check your account after making any transaction online. Verify whether the right amount has been deducted from your account. If you see any discrepancies in the amount, inform the bank immediately.
  • Always use licensed anti-virus software.
    • To protect your computer from new viruses, ensure that you always use licensed anti-virus software. Pirated versions of anti-virus software may be available for free, but they may fail to protect your computer from new viruses prevalent in the online world. In addition, you will get notifications for updates in the software periodically. Make sure that you keep your anti-virus updated, so that your confidential information is always protected.
  • Type your internet banking URL.
    • It is safer to type your bank URL in the address bar of the browser than clicking on links given in an email. There are instances of fraudsters sending emails with fraudulent websites links that are designed exactly like the bank’s original website. Once you enter your login details on such a website, they may be used to access your account and steal your money. While logging on, check for 'https://' in the URL and ensure that it is your bank’s authentic website.

 

Phishing and Spoofing

The most common types of Online Fraud are Phishing and Spoofing. These usually come in the form of fraudulent e-mails that appear to originate from legitimate sources. These e-mails ask customers to verify personal information (phishing) or link to counterfeit (or spoofed) Websites that appear real.

Watch for e-mails that:

  • Urge you to act quickly because your account may be suspended or closed, or to update your personal information.
  • Don't address you by name, but use a more generic one like "Dear Valued Customer."
  • Ask for account numbers, passwords, Access IDs, or other personal information.

Forreston State Bank will NEVER ask for sensitive information, such as account numbers, Access IDs or passwords, via e-mail.

Other Common Fraud Methods

Criminals may also use other contact methods to obtain your private information. These include text messages (also known as short message phishing or "smishing") and through phone calls (also known as voice phishing or "vishing"). You might receive a text message, phone call, or voice mail warning that your account may be suspended, frozen, or compromised unless you visit a particular website or call a designated phone number where you will then be asked for personal information. These scare tactics are designed to convince you to provide your information or face negative consequences.

Again, Forreston State Bank will NEVER ask for sensitive information, such as account numbers, Access IDs or passwords, via e-mail.

What is Identity Theft?

Identity theft occurs when someone acquires your personal information and uses it without your knowledge to commit fraud or theft. It is a serious crime and cases are growing. An all-too-common example is when an identity thief uses your personal information to open a credit card account in your name.

No matter how cautious you are, there is no way to completely prevent identity theft from occurring. But there are ways you can help minimize your risk. This section contains valuable information explaining how you can protect yourself by managing your personal information wisely; the warning signs of identity theft; and what to do if you do become a victim.

Helpful Tips

  • Don't give out personal information on the phone, through the mail, or Online unless you've initiated the contact or are sure you know who you're dealing with.
  • Don't carry your Social Security card with you; leave it in a secure place.
  • Carry only the identification and credit and debit cards that you need.
  • Don't put your address, phone number, or driver's license number on credit card sales receipts.
  • Social Security numbers or phone numbers should not be put on your checks.
  • Shred your charge receipts, copies of credit applications, insurance forms, physician statements, checks and bank statements, expired charge cards that you're discarding, and credit offers you get in the mail.
  • Secure your credit card, bank, and phone accounts with passwords. Avoid using easily available information like birth date, the last four digits of your SSN, or your phone number. When opening new accounts, you may find that many businesses still have a line on their applications for your mother's maiden name. Use a password instead.
  • Secure personal information in your home, particularly if you have roommates or hire outside help.
  • Promptly remove mail from your mailbox. If you're planning to be away from home and can't pick up your mail, call your local U.S. Postal Service  to request a Vacation Hold.
  • Ask about information security procedures in your workplace. Find out who has access to your personal information and verify that records are kept in a secure location. Ask about the disposal procedures for those records as well.
  • Before revealing any personally identifying information (for example, on an application), find out how it will be used and secured, and whether it will be shared with others. Ask if you have a choice about the use of your information. Can you choose to have it kept confidential?

Check Your Credit Report

Order a copy of your credit report from each of the three major credit-reporting agencies every year. Make sure it is accurate and includes only those activities you have authorized. Under the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACT Act) consumers can request and obtain a free credit report once every 12 months from each of the three nationwide consumer credit reporting companies.

By checking your report on a regular basis you can catch mistakes and fraud before they wreak havoc on your personal finances. Don't underestimate the importance of this step.

Free Credit Report

To obtain your free credit report, consumer can call 1-877-322-8228, or order online at
www.annualcreditreport.com or complete the Annual Credit Report Request Form, available
at www.ftc.gov/credit and mail it to:

Annual Credit Report Request Service
P.O. Box 105281,
Atlanta, GA 30348-5281

To Report Fraud:
call: 800-525-6285 or
write: PO Box 740241
Atlanta, GA 30374-0241

Consumer Credit Reporting Agencies

OnGuardOnline.gov

This website was created by the federal government to help people be safe, secure, and responsible online. This website is part of the National Initiative for Cyber security Education.